Believe And Trust

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The larger an organization gets, it becomes impossible for the leader, the CEO, to have working knowledge of everything going on in the company. A time comes when more and more responsibility must be passed on to trusted, high-level employees; otherwise growth will be stifled.

But no matter how long the winning streak, eventually that trust will be tested. In that moment, the CEO will either continue to lead from above, trusting her team, or she will begin to lose faith.

Apple had a long-standing, popular video editing application called Final Cut that they radically changed in 2011. It was such a drastic change, there was upheaval even from the Apple loyalists.

Once the pushback started, CEO Steve Jobs asked its creator, Randy Ubillos: "What the heck is going on with this Final Cut X thing?" After a brief explanation of what needed to be done, Jobs asked Ubillos: "Do you believe in this?” to which he responded, “Yes.” Jobs said, “...then I do too.” (Read the story here.)

That was the end of the conversation. Jobs trusted Ubillos, and Ubillos trusted the integrity of his work. While some may disagree on whether the new Final Cut is "better," it has certainly regained and grown it's user base.

Sometimes the right decision isn't popular, it may even seem like failure at the outset, but a team that has done the work, believes in their product, and trusts each other will succeed.

Stephen RoblesTrust